“Neuroscience typically conceptualizes mindfulness as inner observation of a private mental realm of thoughts, feelings, and body sensations, and models mindfulness as a process occurring in the brain, visible in part through neuroimaging tools. This approach, however, is inadequate for two reasons. First, there is likely to be no one-one mapping between neural networks and cognition; rather, the mapping is likely many-many. Second, the neurobiological conditions for mindfulness should not be equated with mindfulness itself, which, as classically described, consists in the integrated exercise of a whole host of cognitive and bodily skills in situated and ethically directed action.”

Quoted text and video are from Clifford Saron YouTube Channel

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